24th March 2014

Photo reblogged from ☆Niall&Larry☆ with 7,181 notes

aztec-child:

x

aztec-child:

x

Source: Flickr / littlecrumb

24th March 2014

Photo reblogged from ☆Niall&Larry☆ with 397 notes

Source: african-soul

24th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from Visualizing Math with 145 notes

mathhombre:

Playing around with a fractal pattern from an undergrad mentee. Harder to describe the fractal step than I expected beforehand. Obviously Sierpinskish, but it’s fun to think about percent shaded, and the envelope, etc. Ideas or comments welcome!

Source: mathhombre

24th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Visualizing Math with 19,051 notes

jtotheizzoe:

crookedindifference:

17 Equations That Changed The World

I would argue that they merely described the world, rather than changed it, but still cool.

jtotheizzoe:

crookedindifference:

17 Equations That Changed The World

I would argue that they merely described the world, rather than changed it, but still cool.

Source: crookedindifference

24th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Visualizing Math with 528 notes

3mbicommission:

Sacred geometry is the geometry used in the planning and construction of religious structures such as churches, temples, mosques, religious monuments, altars, tabernacles and the creation of religious art. In sacred geometry, symbolic and sacred meanings are ascribed to certain geometric shapes and certain geometric proportions. The study  has its roots in nature and the mathematical principles at work therein. Many forms observed in nature can be related to geometry, for example, the chambered nautilus grows at a constant rate and so its shell forms a logarithmic spiral to accommodate that growth without changing shape. Also, honeybees construct hexagonal cells to hold their honey. These and other correspondences are seen by believers in sacred geometry to be further proof of the cosmic significance of geometric forms. Besides this, some beliefs entail that the significance of sacred geometry started with the consumption of psychedelic substances in these ancient societies, as fractalized imagery that make up these forms are a popular hallucination and occur in ancient monuments that were erected way before mathematic principles were discovered. Geometric ratios, and geometric figures were often employed in the design of Egyptian, ancient Indian, Greek and Roman architecture. Medieval European cathedrals also incorporated symbolic geometry. Indian and Himalayan spiritual communities often constructed temples and fortifications on design plans of mandala and yantra. Many of the sacred geometry principles of the human body and of ancient architecture have been compiled into the Vitruvian Man drawing by Leonardo da Vinci, itself based on the much older writings of the roman architect Vitruvius.
The Flower of Life is considered to provide deep spiritual meaning and forms of enlightenment to those who have studied it as sacred geometry, which is pictured above; along with similar images of cell division and our universe.

3mbicommission:

Sacred geometry is the geometry used in the planning and construction of religious structures such as churches, temples, mosques, religious monuments, altars, tabernacles and the creation of religious art. In sacred geometry, symbolic and sacred meanings are ascribed to certain geometric shapes and certain geometric proportions. The study  has its roots in nature and the mathematical principles at work therein. Many forms observed in nature can be related to geometry, for example, the chambered nautilus grows at a constant rate and so its shell forms a logarithmic spiral to accommodate that growth without changing shape. Also, honeybees construct hexagonal cells to hold their honey. These and other correspondences are seen by believers in sacred geometry to be further proof of the cosmic significance of geometric forms. Besides this, some beliefs entail that the significance of sacred geometry started with the consumption of psychedelic substances in these ancient societies, as fractalized imagery that make up these forms are a popular hallucination and occur in ancient monuments that were erected way before mathematic principles were discovered. Geometric ratios, and geometric figures were often employed in the design of Egyptian, ancient Indian, Greek and Roman architecture. Medieval European cathedrals also incorporated symbolic geometry. Indian and Himalayan spiritual communities often constructed temples and fortifications on design plans of mandala and yantra. Many of the sacred geometry principles of the human body and of ancient architecture have been compiled into the Vitruvian Man drawing by Leonardo da Vinci, itself based on the much older writings of the roman architect Vitruvius.

The Flower of Life is considered to provide deep spiritual meaning and forms of enlightenment to those who have studied it as sacred geometry, which is pictured above; along with similar images of cell division and our universe.

Source: 3mbicommission

24th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Visualizing Math with 584 notes

statest:

@pickover: The color of Pi, e, phi, sqrt(2), and other famous math constants, by V. Ponomarenko. http://t.co/8QWtNGxbsK

statest:

@pickover: The color of Pi, e, phi, sqrt(2), and other famous math constants, by V. Ponomarenko. http://t.co/8QWtNGxbsK

Source: statest

24th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Visualizing Math with 256 notes

3mbicommission:

Geometry is a branch of mathematics concerned with questions of shape, size, relative position of figures, and the properties of space. Geometry arose independently in a number of early cultures as a body of practical knowledge concerning lengths, areas, and volumes, with elements of a formal mathematical science emerging in the West as early as 6th Century BC.  By the 3rd century BC geometry was put into an axiomatic form by Euclid, whose treatment—Euclidean geometry—set a standard for many centuries to follow.  Archimedes developed ingenious techniques for calculating areas and volumes, in many ways anticipating modern integral calculus. The field of astronomy, especially mapping the positions of the stars and planets on the celestial sphere and describing the relationship between movements of celestial bodies, served as an important source of geometric problems during the next one and a half millennia. 
For nearly two thousand years since Euclid, while the range of geometrical questions asked and answered inevitably expanded, basic understanding of space remained essentially the same. Immanuel Kant argued that there is only one absolutegeometry. This dominant view was overturned by the revolutionary discovery of non-Euclidean geometry in the works of Gauss (who never published his theory), Bolyai, and Lobachevsky, who demonstrated that ordinary Euclidean space is only one possibility for development of geometry. A broad vision of the subject of geometry was then expressed by Riemann in his 1867 inauguration lecture Über die Hypothesen, welche der Geometrie zu Grunde liegen (On the hypotheses on which geometry is based), published only after his death. Riemann’s new idea of space proved crucial in Einstein's general relativity theory and Riemannian geometry, which considers very general spaces in which the notion of length is defined, is a mainstay of modern geometry.
 Where the traditional geometry allowed dimensions 1 (a line), 2 (a plane) and 3 (our world conceived of as three-dimensional space), mathematicians have used higher dimensions for nearly two centuries. Dimension has gone through stages of being any natural number n, possibly infinite with the introduction of Hilbert space, and any positive real number in fractal geometry.
The above image contains examples of simple 2D geometric shapes.

3mbicommission:

Geometry is a branch of mathematics concerned with questions of shape, size, relative position of figures, and the properties of space. Geometry arose independently in a number of early cultures as a body of practical knowledge concerning lengths, areas, and volumes, with elements of a formal mathematical science emerging in the West as early as 6th Century BC.  By the 3rd century BC geometry was put into an axiomatic form by Euclid, whose treatment—Euclidean geometry—set a standard for many centuries to follow.  Archimedes developed ingenious techniques for calculating areas and volumes, in many ways anticipating modern integral calculus. The field of astronomy, especially mapping the positions of the stars and planets on the celestial sphere and describing the relationship between movements of celestial bodies, served as an important source of geometric problems during the next one and a half millennia. 

For nearly two thousand years since Euclid, while the range of geometrical questions asked and answered inevitably expanded, basic understanding of space remained essentially the same. Immanuel Kant argued that there is only one absolutegeometry. This dominant view was overturned by the revolutionary discovery of non-Euclidean geometry in the works of Gauss (who never published his theory), Bolyai, and Lobachevsky, who demonstrated that ordinary Euclidean space is only one possibility for development of geometry. A broad vision of the subject of geometry was then expressed by Riemann in his 1867 inauguration lecture Über die Hypothesen, welche der Geometrie zu Grunde liegen (On the hypotheses on which geometry is based), published only after his death. Riemann’s new idea of space proved crucial in Einstein's general relativity theory and Riemannian geometry, which considers very general spaces in which the notion of length is defined, is a mainstay of modern geometry.

 Where the traditional geometry allowed dimensions 1 (a line), 2 (a plane) and 3 (our world conceived of as three-dimensional space), mathematicians have used higher dimensions for nearly two centuries. Dimension has gone through stages of being any natural number n, possibly infinite with the introduction of Hilbert space, and any positive real number in fractal geometry.

The above image contains examples of simple 2D geometric shapes.

Source: 3mbicommission

24th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Corcoran Group: 10am Special with 128 notes

thecorcorangroup10amspecial:

February 7, 2014 – Glamorous Delray Beach Home

15958 D’Alene Drive
Delray Beach, Florida
$2,650,000 | 5 Bedrooms | 5.1 Bathrooms | Approx. 9,168 sq. ft.

Glamour and graciousness: A true estate on one of the best lots in Mizner Country Club. Offering views of the lake and a double fairway on an oversized cul-de-sac lot, this prime location is only enhanced by the interior beauty highlighted with designer features in this five bedroom, five and one-half bath home boasting 9,168 total square feet. Venetian plaster, hand-painted ceilings, mahogany statement doors, and intricate mosaic marble flooring are some of the fine attention to detail in this artisan home.

For more information about today’s 10am Special, please visit corcoran.com.

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24th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Corcoran Group: 10am Special with 148 notes

thecorcorangroup10amspecial:

December 22, 2013 – Direct Intracoastal Delray Beach Estate

209 Palm Trail
Delray Beach, Florida
$5,299,000 | 5 Bedrooms | 6.2 Bathrooms | Approx. 10,450 sq. ft.

This Mediterranean estate is situated on an oversized lot with expansive Intracoastal views. The custom interior features four separate guest suites plus a master suite. The gracious foyer, formal living room with fireplace and detailed ceiling, bar and club room, chef’s kitchen with top-of-the-line cabinetry and appliances and casual living room all open invitingly through French doors leading onto the outdoor entertainment area. The pool, spa, grill and adjacent patio areas create a tropical paradise with exceptional views.

For more information about today’s 10am Special, please visit corcoran.com.

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24th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Corcoran Group: 10am Special with 133 notes

thecorcorangroup10amspecial:

January 25, 2014 – Gorgeous Delray Beach Mediterranean Villa

514 Harbor Court
Delray Beach, Florida
$3,999,000 | 6 Bedrooms | 6.2 Bathrooms | Approx. 11,456 sq. ft.

Tuscan Elegance: Mediterranean Villa Estate one block from the ocean in Delray Beach has a dream location. Enjoy amazing views and wonderful privacy as you enter the courtyard with four car garage. This six bedroom estate has loggias and balconies leading to a resort-style pool with spa. Interior features include a library, billiard room, butler’s kitchen, and gourmet kitchen. An added bonus is your own beach access and private tennis court.

For more information about today’s 10am Special, please visit corcoran.com.

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